Dr. Terry Wahls

  A framework for treating and reversing Multiple Sclerosis, Autoimmune and other Neurodegenerative Diseases Introduction to our Interview of Dr. Terry Wahls  A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure and honor of interviewing Dr. Terry Wahls.  As a patient and person, I am particularly excited when I get to meet and learn from people …

Dr. George Yu

  Cancer and Alzheimer’s metabolism, prevention, calorie restriction, metabolic therapies with Dr. George Yu Interviewed: Monday, September 25, 2017 Location: Dr. Yu’s office in Annapolis, MD Show Notes & Publishing: Friday, October 13, 2017 Cancer and Alzheimer’s metabolism, prevention, calorie restriction, metabolic therapies with Dr. George Yu For the Conference from November 3rd through 5th …

Nature / Q&A with Joel Weinstock

Helminths are worms that can live in the human intestine. Joel Weinstock, a gastroenterologist at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, studies how they affect inflammation and the body’s immune response. He spoke to Nature about how helminths might lead to treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Immune-mediated diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, type 1 …

Cancer’s Invasion Equation

We can detect tumors earlier than ever before. Can we predict whether they’re going to be dangerous? Over the summer of 2011, the water in Lake Michigan turned crystal clear. Shafts of angled light lit the lake bed, like searchlights from a U.F.O.; later, old sunken ships came into view from above. Pleasure was soon replaced …

Now is the time to be bullish about digital health, according to this investor

A recent article suggested that the digital health sector might be dead, with early-stage investors not getting their desired returns.This investor and operator says there’s still plenty of reason to be optimistic. Earlier this month, my friend and industry colleague Rob Coppedge wrote a thoughtful post on the death of digital health, a space associated with too …

This fun, simple exercise plan shapes up seniors. Could it save their bones?

What might it take to get Medicare to pay for exercise the way it pays for drugs? Science. At least that’s what Christopher Sciamanna, a primary-care doctor at Penn State College of Medicine, hopes. He is leading a large clinical trial that is testing whether a cheap, community-based exercise program that uses stretchy, color-coded bands can …